Tenses:- they are trickier than you thought…

Simple Present

Form

[VERB] + s/es in third person

Use the Simple Present to express the idea that an action is repeated or usual. The action can be a habit, a hobby, a daily event, a scheduled event or something that often happens. It can also be something a person often forgets or usually does not do.

Examples:

  • I play tennis.
  • She does not play tennis.ACTIVE / PASSIVE

    Examples:

    • Once a week, Tom cleans the car. Active
    • Once a week, the car is cleaned by Tom. Passive

    Simple Past

    Form

    [VERB+ed] or irregular verbs

    Examples:

    • You called Debbie.
    • Did you call Debbie?
    • She washed her car.
    • She ran to the shops.

    ACTIVE / PASSIVE

    Examples:

    • Tom repaired the car. Active
    • The car was repaired by Tom. Passive

    Simple Future

    Simple Future has two different forms in English: “will” and “be going to.” Although the two forms can sometimes be used interchangeably, they often express two very different meanings. These different meanings might seem too abstract at first, but with time and practice, the differences will become clear. Both “will” and “be going to” refer to a specific time in the future.

    [will + verb]

    Examples:

    • You will help him later.
    • Will you help him later?

    FORM Be Going To

    [am/is/are + going to + verb]

    Examples:

    • You are going to meet Jane tonight.
    • Are you going to meet Jane tonight?

      ACTIVE / PASSIVE

      Examples:

      • John will finish the work by 5:00 PM. Active
      • The work will be finished by 5:00 PM. Passive
      • Sally is going to make a beautiful dinner tonight. Active
      • A beautiful dinner is going to be made by Sally tonight. Passive
Advertisements

About class03

Class teacher at Robin Hood School. Literacy Coordinator
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s